Edward Maddox, 1615-1694

Edward Maddox/Maddock was a notable figure of the English establishment in the Virginia and Maryland Colonies of the 17th century.  While we do not yet fully understand his origins (his birth year is a rumor at best), we find him in the Colonies as a defender of the Protestant faith and as a major land speculator, and he would be called doctor, apothecary, justice of the peace, and gentleman in a long list of records in courthouses on both sides of the Potomac River, demonstrating his crucial participation in the Colonies’ early development.

Our first records of Edward date to 1648, when we find his name listed in the register of the ancient Anglican parish of Munslow in Shropshire, England (http://www.melocki.org.uk/salop/Munslow.html).  He’s described as “of Thonglands,” implying that he lived in a small hamlet just northeast of the church. The modern remnants of Thonglands are illustrated on a British Ordinance Survey as a moated farmhouse along Trow Brook at 52.497520, -2.665587.  The building long predates Edward’s time in the area, according to the 11th-century Domesday Book.

Thonglands with moat and dovecot

After centuries of occupation, the Thonglands home now consists of numerous architectural styles, and includes a crumbling stone dovecot, a partial moat, and a very old outdoor loo featuring a gargoyle.

The Munslow parish baptismal records show Edward and his wife Ellinor shepherding their family through church rites – sons Edward, Cornelius and John, and daughter Elinor.  On 5 February 1655/6, his first wife Ellinor was buried at Munslow Parish in Shropshire, England.  Ellinor was buried a week before her infant son John, possibly meaning that they died of a shared disease or other shared cause.  He then married the widow Dorothy Holding on 25 March 1656 (considered New Years Day at the time). Edward and Dorothy gave birth to their daughter Alice about nine months later (i.).  Dorothy probably was the widow of Richard Holding, with whom she gave birth to Abigall Holding in 1651, based on Abigall’s baptism on 1 March 1652.

StMichaels church stained glass

One of three 15th-century stained glass windows that remain in tact in St. Michael’s Church, Munslow, Shropshire.  Visitors can sit in the same pews that Edward, Ellinor, Dorothy and their children sat in.

Edward and Ellinor Maddox (m. before 1648) had the following children (i.):

  1. Edward Maddox, baptized 8 April 1648 in Munslow Parish, Shropshire, England; died by 1690 in Charles County, Maryland, based on a petition by his stepson Henry Frankcum, Jr. for land held by Edward Maddock, “dec’d” (ii.). In America, Edward confirmed the birth date noted in his English baptismal record when he claimed he was roughly “22 or 23” years old in 1668 and claimed that he was 26 in 1670 in Charles County, Maryland (iii.).  He married Henry Frankcum’s widow Annah/Amey Frankcum on or after 1668 (iv.).  Before marrying her, Edward sold her one mare on 1 March 1668/9 at unstated cost, and Amey quickly gave the mare and four cows to her existing children, Henry and Elizabeth Frankum, on 22 March 1668/9 – and Edward and Amey made a point of recording the transfers with the county court, perhaps as some sort of economic preparation for marriage (v.).  Richard Fowke was a witness to both of these transfers and might have been Amey Frankum’s father.  Although he is never called “apothecary” like his father was, the younger Edward also practiced or delivered medicine, as is shown in his 1670 lawsuit against Samuell Price for failure to pay for “a purge,” “a bleeding,” “a cupping,” and more (v.a.).  Edward’s cattle mark was “the left eare cropt the right ear hole with a nick in the under part of the same” (vi.).   Later, Dr. Edward Maddox would chastise Amey Maddocks in his own 1694 will for marrying again without consent after his son Edward’s death: a circa-1899 history of Stafford County’s Overwharton Parish claims Dr. Maddox punished Amey Maddox, by not willing anything to her, because she had married a man – Thomas Derrick – without the doctor’s consent (vii.).
  2. Elinor Maddox, baptized 8 May 1650 in Munslow Parish, Shropshire, England.  An Eleanor Maddox married Edward Evans (alias Tyler), on 1 May 1682, in Munslow.  They baptized a son Edward on 3 April 1683.  Eleanor (Maddox) Tyler was buried at Munslow on 1 January 1710.  Edward Tyler was buried on 18 August 1718. Edward and Elinor’s son Edward would marry Frances and baptize a son also named Edward on 6 August 1707, and baptize a daughter Elizabeth on 16 May 1710.
  3. Cornelius Maddox, baptized 4 October 1651 in Munslow Parish, Shropshire, England; married Mary Smallwood on 16 March 1685 in Charles County, Maryland (viii.; ix.; x.); died 1705/6 in Charles County (xi.). Cornelius is our direct ascendant and his full biography can be read here.
  4. John Maddox, born 6 March 1654/5 and baptized 3 April 1655 in Munslow Parish, Shropshire, England; buried 12 February 1655/6 in Munslow Parish, Shropshire, England.  John died seven days after his mother Ellinor died, possibly implying a shared disease or other shared cause of death.

Edward and Dorothy (Holding) Maddox (m.  25 March 1656) had one child about nine months after they married, and might have had additional children but no others have yet been identified:

  1. Alice Maddox, born 8 January 1656 in Munslow Parish, Shropshire, England.  An Alice Maddox is listed among passengers to Virginia in 1656, but is unlikely the same Alice because her sponsor was living in Nansemond County, Virginia – far from our Alice’s family along the Potomac River (xi.a.). We believe Edward and Dorothy’s Alice is the same Alice who married Charles Cale and died after 1729 in King George County, Virginia. She is described as Alice (Watts) Cale in one record and as the widow of William Strother in another record, possibly making her Alice Maddox Watts Strothers Cale (xi.b.).  Edward bequeathed 200 acres to Alice Cale in his 1694 will, and the gift was reaffirmed in a 1723 King George County, Virginia, deed (xii.).  The 200 acres were part of a 500-acre plot that was originally owned by Edward on the Rappahanock River, “along Claibournes Run” and one mile “below the falls,” placing the site at 38.303131, -77.454759. Alice’s acreage and possibly her house are specifically described in the National Park Service’s survey of George Washington’s Ferry Farm site – his boyhood home.

Edward moved to America between 1656 and 1668, based on the dates of his children’s births in England and the earliest date of his court appearances in Maryland (xix.).  One immigration record shows an Edward Maddox arriving in Virginia in 1652, but this 1652 immigration was sponsored by someone in Northumberland County, Virginia – far from our Edward’s Potomac River residence (xii.a.).  After 1668, Edward interacted with his children Edward, Cornelius and Alice in numerous records in Virginia and Maryland.  His son Edward was in Charles County, Maryland, by 1668 (xiii.), but his son Cornelius did not show up in known Colonial records until he was listed on a 1680 receipt for payment for transport to Maryland – raising questions about individual family members’ arrival dates (xiv.).  His child Elinor remained in Shropshire, England, based on Munslow Parish records (i.).

In America, Dr. Edward Maddox owned thousands of acres in various plots primarily in Charles County, Maryland and Stafford County, Virginia – counties separated geographically only by the Potomac River.  But politically, the two states were widely separated.  The Virginia government was staunchly Protestant, while Maryland was established by the Calverts as a haven for religious tolerance and was run by a majority of Catholic delegates.  Protestant-Catholic tension was a hallmark of Edward’s era, and played out dramatically in the Colonies.  Charles County was considered “the seedbed of Protestant disaffection” (xiv.a.). We have to wonder how Edward was affected by the drama.  He moved to Virginia from Maryland by 1684, and we see him aligning with anti-Catholic politicians in Virginia by 1689.  In April 1689, in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution (the overthrow of the Catholic King James II of England), Protestants led by John Coode temporarily overthrew the Catholic government of Maryland.  Perhaps Edward had moved to Virginia to avoid such problems.

In Charles County, Maryland, Edward owned at least eight plantations including Lyons Hole (an early patent from Lord Baltimore), Doges Neck, Cheshire, Greene’s Purchase, Stone Hill, Athey’s Hopewell, Maddock’s Folly, and Nanjemoy (xv.).  Lyons Hole might have been named after the town of Lyonshall, just southwest of Edward’s Munslow Parish.  Half of these plantations appear to have been investments only.  In Virginia, he owned at least 500 acres “about a mile below the falls” of the Rappahanock River in Stafford County – a site that would later serve as George Washington’s boyhood home (xvi.); he owned 450-500 acres with a home along the Passapantanzy Creek, which he willed to the local Stafford Parish (later called Overwharton Parish) of Stafford County (xvii.); and he probably owned 600 acres just south of Potomac Creek in Stafford County as a result of his marriage to George Mason I’s widow (xvii.a.).  In his twilight – around 1690 – he invested in Plot #15 of the planned Marlborough Town, in Stafford County (xviii.).

John Speed's 1676 map of Colonial Virginia and Maryland illustrates Native American tribes along the shores of the Potomac River, and just a few English settlements. Edward Maddox's plantations in Stafford County and Charles County were at the edge of

John Speed’s 1676 map of Colonial Virginia and Maryland depicts the locations of Native American tribes along the shores of the Potomac River, but just a few English settlements. Edward Maddox’s plantations in Stafford County and Charles County were at the edge of “the wilderness.”

Edward used at least two of those known properties as residences.  He lived on his 500-acre Nanjemoy plantation in Charles County, Maryland, for some years before 1684.  “Nanjemoy” was a term used to describe the greater area of plantations centered around Nanjemoy Creek in the vicinity of 38.448820, -77.142862, but  we have not yet found the exact location of Edward’s Nanjemoy tract.  After his 1684 sale of Nanjemoy, he resided on his 500-acre tract along the Passapatanzy Creek in Stafford County, Virginia (now King George County), until his death in 1694.  The Northern Neck historian Jerrilyn Eby claims that Edward’s house was located between modern Glebe Road and Bethel Baptist Church on Virginia State Road 218 (xviii.a.), which would place it at roughly 38.300587, -77.346150.

In addition to his land speculation, Edward – referred to as doctor, surgeon, apothecary or physician in court documents – practiced medicine throughout the area (xix.).  He was called into court on furtive charges of fraud at least once, and called others into court frequently to pay for services rendered.  His treatments ranged from simple salves to long-term cures for “grievous pains and troubles.”  It’s not clear where the doctor received his training – almost certainly in a school or apprenticeship in England, but we have not yet found records of his training or practice there.

By no means limited to land grabs and frontier surgery, Dr. Maddox also can be found in an early record claiming a £200 bounty for the head of a wolf – at the time a rampant threat to the colonists (xx.).  He also imported “fuetiane” on 14 March 1675 (xxi.).  “Fuetiane” is an alternate spelling of “fustian,” which is a heavy woollen cloth used by the colonists for clothing (sort of like jean cloth). Additionally, Edward was paid for capturing an American Indian: in November 1687 an Englishman was murdered by a group of conspiratorial Indians, according to a Stafford County record, and county men were sent to capture a group of Oneidas up the James River. Edward Maddox obliged and was paid for his effort on 16 November 1687 (xxi.a.).  He seems to have had his hands in everything.

Edward included his sons in his dealings, as poignantly demonstrated by his son Cornelius suing him for 1,000 pounds of tobacco in 1684-5 (xxii.).  A chronology of dealings with Thomas Hussey by Edward and Cornelius Maddox in both Charles County, Maryland and Stafford County, Virginia, demonstrates a likely business handoff from Edward to Cornelius (Hussey-Maddox interaction 1600s).  The chronology shows that Dr. Edward Maddocks dealt directly with Thomas Hussey in Charles County, Maryland, in 1681-1686.  After 1686 (just after Cornelius’ marriage), Cornelius generally deals with Thomas Hussey, receiving payments.

Edward’s peripatetic land ownership and business dealings demonstrate his competence, but also his intense social aspiration.  In America, Edward would marry women of the Stone and Mason families, inheriting their property and outliving them, but producing no additional children that we know of.

  • Edward married the widow Margery Stone by 1678 and she died after 1684 based on her acknowledgments of property sales (xxiii.).  She is proven to be the widow of Matthew Stone (son of William Stone, the Governor of Maryland in 1649-1655), but if Margery and Matthew had any children their names are unknown.  Edward took ownership of the Cheshire and Nanjemoy tracts in Charles County, Maryland, through marriage to Margery Stone (xxiii.a.).
  • Edward married the twice-widowed Frances Norgrave Mason after 1686 (date based on the 1686 death of her husband and progenitor of the Mason family, Colonel George Mason I) and she died in 1693 (xxiv).  Edward possibly took ownership of a 600-acre tract south of the Potomac Creek in Stafford County, Virginia, through marriage to Frances Norgrave Mason (xxiv.a.).  Edward’s familial and political relationships with the Masons probably explain his son Cornelius‘ later activities in Stafford County – especially Cornelius’ participation in his step-brother George Mason II’s 1697 hunt for the fugitive Esquire Tom in Stafford County, Virginia, despite Cornelius’ residence across the Potomac in Charles County, Maryland.

Edward was sworn in as a Justice of the Peace in Stafford County on 12 August 1691 (xxv.).  His ascendance to a legislative role placed him in a position to publicly demonstrate his interests – a boon for our research.  Edward witnessed significant political and religious intrigue, such as the March 1689 “Parson Waugh’s Tumult” – the case of a vehement anti-Catholic minister provoking an attack by Virginia Protestants against local Catholics.  The Stafford County, Virginia, parson John Waugh conspired with his in-law George Mason II to fan the flames of local distrust against a Catholic family (the Brents).  He started a rumor that the Brents were in league with Maryland Catholics, who were going to cross the Potomac with Seneca Indians to attack Virginians – a rumor that many locals took very seriously.  In the context of the anti-Catholic Glorious Revolution and Whig-Tory politics in London and Jamestown, such provocation was not unimaginable.  Parson Waugh’s conspiracy did not pan out – Marylanders quickly pointed out that there were no Seneca Indians in Maryland! – and the Parson and George Mason II were punished.  But the incident might have inspired John Coode’s similar-but-successful April 1689 conspiracy in Maryland.

As Justice of the Peace, Edward sat in judgment of Parson Waugh in the case of Waugh’s marriage of Mary Hathaway, the nine-year-old daughter of Thomas Hathaway of Aquia, to Mr. William Williams.  Edward and the the other justices ruled in 1691 that upon reaching the age of twelve years Mary could “publickly disclaim the said marriage and protest against it, then it is the judgment of this court the aforesaid marriage …is utterly null and void as if the same had never been had or made.” Mary declared her freedom, citing “infancy and impuberty as well as force and fraud” at the time of her marriage (xxv.a.).  Despite Dr. Maddock’s justice role and his awareness of the parson’s character flaws, he would will his 500-acre plantation along the Passapatanzy Creek to Parson Waugh’s Stafford Parish in 1694 (xxvi.).  Parson Waugh lived there until his death, and the historic Overwharton Parish found its roots there.

That Dr. Maddocks willed so much acreage to a man of such notoriety may speak to the doctor’s Protestant resolve, his Whig alliance, and his strong familial relations in Stafford County.  The doctor specified in his will that the land should not go to his daughter-in-law Anne/Amey because she had married Thomas Derrick without approval.  We have to wonder if Thomas Derrick was Catholic or otherwise against the doctor’s political allies.

Dr. Maddock’s marriage to Frances Norgrave Mason – the widow of Captain John Norgrave and Colonel George Mason I – also adds to the picture.  Edward and Frances were married from about 1686 until her death in 1693.  Perhaps Frances encouraged the doctor to support Parson Waugh out of respect for the Mason family.  Parson Waugh was directly related to George Mason II, who was equally chastised for his role in the Tumult and stripped of his militia command.

An archeological survey of the Marlborough Town site reveals plot #15's exact location, with modern-day Virginia Highway 621 underlaid.

An archeological survey of the Marlborough Town site reveals plot #15’s exact location, with “Doctor Maddox” written within, and with modern-day Virginia Highway 621 underlaid.

Just as Edward’s Justice of the Peace role provides insight into his social and political involvement, Edward’s circa-1690 purchase of Plot #15 in Marlborough Town, Stafford County, Virginia, provides some insight into business dealings, and makes his local presence seem a little more palpable.  Marlborough Town was intended by the aristocratic colonist William Fitzhugh to be a major port town for Virginia, but the local tobacco planters saw the plan as a British government effort to centralize trade and enforce taxation.  Its original developers included Edward and the rest of his fellow Stafford justices, and they managed to initiate plans and start building on the site, but the initiative faded after just a few years.

“Doctor Maddox” is clearly written within the confines of plot #15 on the survey map, which was drawn up by Bland in 1691 and copied in a ledger by the Marlborough Town revivalist John Mercer in the 1730s.  John Mercer’s “Land Book” shows that Edward owned the plot, and sold it to his friend John Waugh after a short time.  But it’s surprising to see the doctor’s name written so clearly on such an old map – one of the earliest surviving surveys of the Virginia colony.

The Smithsonian archeologist C. Malcolm Watkins conducted a full survey of the Marlborough Town site in 1968 and published his results in The Cultural History of Marlborough, Virginia.  He was able to definitively locate Edward’s plot #15, and it was easy to compare Watkins’ maps with Google Maps details.  Doctor Maddox’s plot was located at 38.358003, -77.292369 (or 561-577 Marlborough Point Road).  This was intended to be the center of town and his plot was surrounded by prominent Virginians’ plots.

A horse grazes in a field next to Edward Maddox's Marlborough Point plot.

A horse grazes in a field next to Edward Maddox’s historic Marlborough Town plot, with the Potomac River in the distance.

Dr. Maddox died in Stafford County, Virginia, in mid-1694, based on secondary documents that refer to his original 23 June 1694 will and his 11 December 1694 probate (xxvii.).  While Edward’s original will is long lost to war (most Stafford County courthouse documents were burned in the Civil War), those secondary documents demonstrate his final worldly interests – at least partially.  These documents put to rest the mistaken claim by some genealogists that Edward Maddox had no heirs.  Three deeds, below, combine to form a 550-acre allotment along the Rappahanock River one mile below the falls, in Stafford County, Virginia.  This would later be the site of George Washington’s boyhood home, Ferry Farm.  The fourth account is for a 500-acre allotment along the Passapantanzy Creek in Stafford County.  It’s quite possible that he willed additional land to others, such as his son Cornelius, but those records are yet to be discovered.

  1. The first account of Dr. Edward Maddox’s will is a 1710 deed recorded in Richmond County, Virginia, establishing Maurice Clark’s ownership of 150 of 550 acres that Dr. Edward Maddox owned on Acquia Run in Stafford County, Virginia.  It reads, “3-263: John Hamilton died seized of 150 A. in Richmond County part of 550 A. purchased by Edward Maddock of John Waugh Clk of Stafford Co.  Said 550 A. is part of 2000 A. granted Col. John Catlett 2 June 1666 & by conveyances vested in Maddock, who by Will 13 June 1694 gave 150 A. not disposed of by his will to Clark.  Endorsement by Marmaduke Beckwith, Clk of said county.  Escheat grant to Maurice Clark of Richmond Co. 150 A. on Rappahannock R. adj. Mr. Brent & John Robins in Richmond Co. 14 Sept. 1710.”  The first house built on this site (pre-1710) was recently excavated by the George Washington Foundation and the results can be seen here. The Foundation believes that Maurice Clark was a servant and received the acreage as an award for his service, but we do not yet understand Maurice Clark’s relationship to Dr. Edward Maddox.   (Source: “Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants,” Vol. I, Book No. 3, 1703-1710, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1987, p. 44.)
  2. The second account of Dr. Edward Maddox’s will is related to the first account, above.  It is a King George County, Virginia, deed in 1722, claiming that Dr. Maddox willed a 200-acre portion of a 500-acre plantation (the same as in the first account) to John Robbins.  This land was “about a mile below the falls” of the Rappahanock River in Stafford County.  Dr. Edward Maddox originally willed the acreage to John Robbins, son of Robert Robbins, but stipulated that the land should go to John Stone if John Robbins had no son, and further stipulated that the land should go to John Stone’s brother Thomas Stone if John Stone had no son.  Since John Robbins and John Stone had no sons, the land eventually went to Thomas Stone.  We do not yet understand why Edward felt that the Robbins family should receive land, except perhaps as an award for their Whig politics (Robert Robbins was investigated for participating in a plot against the Catholic governor of Maryland, according to Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1671-1681, Volume 15, Page 409).  John and Thomas Stone are assessed to be related to Dr. Edward Maddox’s former wife Margery (Stone) Maddox as her nephews through her marriage to their uncle Matthew Stone.   (Source: From 1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp.54- 58.)
  3. The third account of Dr. Edward Maddox’s will also relates to the first and second accounts, above.  In this 1723 King George County, Virginia, deed, Alice Cale (the doctor’s daughter) receives 200 acres of the 500-acre plot that was originally owned by Dr. Edward Meaddock. This site was “along Claibourne’s Run,” placing it at 38.303131, -77.454759. This third account of 200 acres completes the dispersal of Edward’s 550-acre plot along the Rappahanock River.  Cale’s acreage is specifically described in the National Park Service’s survey of George Washington’s Ferry Farm site. (Source: 1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp. 249-252.)
  4. The fourth account of Dr. Edward Maddox’s will is from a circa-1899 history of Stafford County’s Overwharton Parish, in which the author claims Dr. Maddox willed the entirety of his estate – 450-500 acres with a home along the Passapantanzy Creek in Stafford County – to Parson Waugh’s parish in 1694.  In this account Dr. Edward Maddox was apparently punishing his daughter-in-law, Amey Maddox (widow of Dr. Maddox’s son, Edward Maddox), by not willing anything to her because she married Thomas Derrick without Edward’s consent.  The author incorrectly claims in this 1899 account that Amey was Edward’s only child, but we know she was his daughter-in-law and we know the doctor had other heirs in the county – including his daughter Alice, in account #3, above.  It’s important to note that the recipient of Edward’s land also was administering Edward’s will – a fact seemingly lost on all genealogists and historians – and we have to wonder if the notorious Parson Waugh might have been working the will to his own advantage (xxviii).  Here’s an account of the Parish register by circa 1899 researcher William Boogher:

“The largest legacy that Overwharton Parish received during the Seventeenth Century was from Doctor Edward Maddox.  The last will and Testament of Doctor Edward Maddox ‘of Stafford Parish, Stafford, in the Colony of Virginia’ was dated June 23, 1694; it was admitted to probate on December 11, 1694.  His only child [daughter-in-law], Amy Maddox, married without his approbation, Thomas Derrick and for this reason Doctor Maddox made the following bequest:

“‘I first give and bequeath this plantation whereupon I now live and all the lands thereto appertaining and to me belonging to be and forever after to continue as a glebe and manse for the reception and encouragement of a pious and able minister in that parish wherein I now live being commonly known and called by the name of Stafford, or the upper parish of Stafford County; and that after my decease it be well and truly improved and managed at all times for the intent above said excepting that while there is no minister to serve ye cure in the said parish then I will and desire that the said plantation and land together with all its profits and advantages (before the time of vacancy above said) fully  improved and laid out for the relief and support of such poor and indigent as in the said parish shall seem most in want at the discretion of the church wardens and vestry of the above said parish for the time being.’

“Doctor Maddox’s plantation consisted of between 450 and 500 acres on Passapantanzy Creek not far from the plantation of the Reverend Mr. John Waugh.  It was enjoyed as a glebe by the curate of Stafford [later Overwharton] Parish until after the death of the Reverend Mr. Robert Buchan in 1804 when Doctor Maddox’s descendants instigated suit claiming it was no longer being used as stipulated in his last will and Testament and recovered it.” (Source:  Boogher, William Fletcher. Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760, Old Stafford County. Washington: Saxton Printing Co., 1899, pp. 176-195, online at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vastaffo/overwhartonparishregister176.htm.)

A doll guards the entrance to Edward Maddox's Pazzapatanzy Creek acreage at the turnoff to State Route 605 from State Route 218.

A sleepy guard watches the entrance to Edward Maddox’s Pazzapatanzy Creek acreage at the intersection of State Routes 605 and 218, in King George County, Virginia.

This family narrative was written and placed online by Narratio Vitae.

NOTES:

One family historian has made an unsubstantiated claim that Edward’s daughter Alice was actually the daughter of Dr. Edward Maddox’s later wife Frances (Norgrave) (Mason) Maddox by a previous husband named Thomas Watts (and therefore Alice would not be the daughter of Dorothy (Holding) Maddox).  The family historian’s claim is disproven by Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, Page 43 – notes from Court held 7th April 1690 – in which the court describes “[Thomas] Watts who intermarried with Frances the other daughter of Capt. John Norgrave.”  Edward’s wife Frances was the widow of Capt. John Norgrave – not Capt. Norgrave’s daughter.  In other words, Frances (Norgrave) (Mason) Maddox was never married to Thomas Watts.

At least one Maddox genealogist (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~maddoxetc/Thomas.html) has claimed that Edward Maddox’s father was Thomas Maddox (Lord Scethrog), who arrived in Jamestown in 1620 and died in 1623.  This is impossible because Thomas Maddox (Lord Scethrog) died in 1620 in Wales (source: Brecon Probate Index, 1609-1653, N.L.W., p. 52).

The same genealogist claims that Edward Maddox owned land in Jamaica in 1670, according to a census available at http://genealogy-quest.com/census-records/1670-st-thomas-parish-jamaica-census/.  However, this was not a list of land owners – it was a census of permanent residents in Jamaica.  Permanent residence in Jamaica would be impossible for someone already living in Maryland.

Separately, the Munslow Parish records list an Edward Maddox, buried on 10 October 1657, and an Alice Maddox, widow, buried on 8 February 1662.  These could be the parents of our Edward Maddox (d. 1694).

SOURCES:

i. “Registers of the Parish Munslow,” transcribed and copyrighted by Mel Lockie, 2011, http://www.melocki.org.uk, pp. 90-100.

ii. Charles County Land Records, Volume III Liber Q, Page 10 – dated 10 June 1690.

iii. Charles County Court Proceedings, 1668-1670, Liber D, p. 133 and pp. 165-166.

iv. I&A 5.285.

v. Charles County Court & Land Records Vol II, p. 26; Charles County Court & Land Records Vol II, p. 82; and Charles County Court Proceedings, 1668—1670, Liber D. pp. 54-59:

“Mr Edward Maddock of Charles County desires to have this Following bill of sale recorded Know all men by these presents that I Edwar: Maddock of Charles County in the Province of Mary Land Doe from me my heires Executors and Asignes alienate Sell and by these presents have made sale of my sorrell Mare bought of Mr James Walker of the same County & Province with the Markes as followeth A slit in each eare and burned in the left buttock J: W: which said Mare & all her future encrease I doe warrant the saile of agt the just claime of any person or persons whatsoever unto Mrs Amey Frankcum her heires Executors or Assignes forever In witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and seale this first day of March 1668/9 Signed sealed. & Deliver’d Ed: Maddock 0 in the prsence of us Zachary Wade; Richard Fowke”

“56] Amey Frankum Widdow desireth this Deed of Gift to be recorded Know all men by these presents that I Amey Frankcum of Charles Liber D County in the Province of Maryland Widdow and Administratrex of Henry Frankcum of the same County & Province late deceased Doe make over give and bequeath & alienate unto my Children Henry Frankcum and Elizabeth Frankcum four Cowes called by name young Store young Colle Stroberry and Cherry with all their Increase to them their heires Executores, Administrators or Asignes for ever warranting the said Cowes unto my said sone & Daughter against the Just Claime of any Person or persons what soe ever And further doe promise and Grant in the behalfe of my sone and Daughter that att what time soe ever either of them shall think fitt to dispose of them selves either by Marriage or other wise that the said Henry and Elizabeth shall make equall Division betwixt them both by male & female of the four Cowes and their future Increase [p. 57] And like wise doe bind me my heires Executors and Asignes in the true Performance of this above mentioned And further doe alienate & give unto my Son & Daughter one breeding Mare which Mares Increase is to runn equally betwixt them till such time that each of them hath a breeding Mare & an horse And after each of them hath a Mare and An horse apeece then the future Increase to runn for the Good of my Sone and Daughter And if it please God that either my Sone or Daughter should die first then the full & whole Increase to be the Survivour’s And if it please God that both my Sone and Daughter die then the foure Cowes and their Increase wth the Mare and her Increase to returne unto me Amey Frankcum and Mother unto the said Henry & Elizabeth Frankcum the mark of the said Mare is A sorrell Mare with J W burn’d on her left Buttock which Mare was bought of Mr James Walker of Wicocomaco the Cowes marke be as followeth viz Swallow forked on the right [p. 58] eare and Cropt on the left eare which Cowes and their Increase and the Mare and her Increase I doe by these presents bind me my Heires Executors Administrators and Asignes firmely by these presets in Witnesse whereof I have here unto set my hand and Seale this twenty second day of March 1668/9 It is further my Desire and Will that after my Son and Daughter hath one Mare and one horse apeece from & by the Increase of the Mare above named then the said old mare to returne to me the said Amey Frankcum & Mother of the said Children Signed Sealed & Deliver’d Amey A Frankcum in prsence of us her Marke 0
Richard Fowke
Thomas Wentworth
Joannes Wrighte”

“It is alsoe my desire and pleasure that if my Sone & Daughter [p. 59] should die before they Come to enjoy either by Marriage or Age or that it please God to take them away by death that then the said Cowes with their Increases and the said Mare wth her Increase to returne unto me my Heires Executors Administrators and As-signes & for the Confirmation of the true performance thereof I have here unto sett my hand & seale this twenty second of March 1668/9 Amey A Frankcum
Signed Sealed & Delivered her marke 0
In the presence of us
Zachary Wade
Richard Fowke”

v.a. Charles County Court Proceedings, 1668—1670, Liber D, pp. 164-166:

“Whereupon Richd Boughton Attr for the Deft Confessed a judged

for 400 lb of tobaccoe according to the tenoure of the Declar:
Edwd Maddock Plt came to prosecute the sute by him Comenced agt
Samll Price
Samll Price Deft came also & appeared to defend the sute comenced
agt him by Edwd Maddock
Edwd Maddock Plt Samll Price Deft in a plea of trespass upon
the Case
Whereupon the said Edwd Complaineth agt the said Samll for tht
whereas the said Samll on the 70 day of Octor in the xxxviii yeare
of the Dominion of Caecilius & att diverse daies & times since till
this prsent day had & recd from him the said Edwd diverse parcells of
phisick & other Attendance amounting to the sume of two hundred
[p. 165] pounds of tob as by a particular Acct by the said Edwd here in Court
produc’d more plainely may appeare in consideracon whereof the said
Sam” did then Assume on himself & to the sd Edwd did faithfully
promise tht he the said Sam” the said sume of two hundred & forty
pounds of tobaccoe to him the said Edwd would well & truly satisfy &
pay when thereunto required yet never the less the sd Sam” his promise
& Assumption little minding or regarding but deviseing & fraudulently
intending him the sd Edwd of the said sume of 240 lb of tob to deceive
the said sume of two hundred & forty pounds of tob to him the sd
Edwd although often thereunto by him the said Edward required hath
not satisfi’d the same but doth altogether refuse to satisfy the same
whereupon the said Edwd saith he is Damnified & hath Loss to the
Valew of 350 lb of tob & thereupon he bringeth his suite
Whereupon this ensueing bill was produced
Samll Price Dr Octor the 7 1668
To a purge 30
To bleeding you 20
To Cupping you severall tims 150
To a Cord jail Bolus 040
240

[p. 166] Whereupon the Defd requested the plt might sweare to his Acct
Edwd Maddock aged twenty six yeares or there about sworne &
saith tht the praticular of this Acct are just & true & tht he never
received any part of Satisfaction
Whereupon It was ordered tht the Deft satisfy to the Plt 240 lb
of tob Costs & Chargs of suite or else Execuon.
Whereupon the plt produced this bill of Costs wch was allowed him
To two daies Attendance & goeing & comeing 120 lb”

vi. Charles County Court Proceedings, Liber E, 10 September 1672.

vii. Boogher, William Fletcher. Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760, old Stafford County. Washington: Saxton Printing Co., 1899, pp. 176-195.

viii. Mary Smallwood was born on 2 November 1670, according to Keith, Arthur L. “Smallwood Family of Southern Maryland,” Maryland Historical Magazine, Volume XXII, June 1927, p. 148.  “The Smallwood Family of Md. & Va.” comp. by Mildred A. McDonnell, 1970, pp. 6-8; “The Emison Families Supplement,” comp. by James Wade Emison, Vincennes, Ind. 1962.

ix. La Plata. Lib M No 1, fol.27.  March 16, 1685/6 James Smallwood made gift of one cow and one mare to daughter Mary Maddocks.

x. La Plata, Lib. S, No. 1, fol. 342.  Will of John Smallwood (son of James Smallwood) dated March 20, 1693/4, prob Aug 6, 1694 “I give to my sister Mary Maddocks the other 50 acres Joyning unto Pryors land unto her heirs forever, and I give unto my brother-in-law Cornelius Maddocks one bay horse with a white face cropt of one year and (illegible) on the other.”

xi. Maryland Inv. & Act. Book 25:222.

xi.a. An Alice Maddox is listed as a passenger to Virginia in the book Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. I, according to Cumulated Supplements containing more than 650,000 additional records To Passenger & Immigration Lists Index: A Guide to Published Arrival Records of about 500,000 Passengers Who Came to the United States and Canada, cited online at http://www.maddoxgenealogy.com/data_immigration_ua_02.html.  In addition to Alice, an Ann Mattocks sailed to Virginia in 1656, according to the same sources, but we do not know if Alice and Ann are linked in some way.

xi.b. Alice was described as the widow of William Strother in Westmoreland County deed of lease 1:635, 4 December 1729.  She was described as Alice (Watts) Cale in a King George County probate record (COB#1, p. 621, 623), on 1 December 1732.

xii. 1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part II, (Antient Press); pp. 637-641:
“Indenture 4th/5th December 1729 between ALICE CALE Parish of Hanover King George County Widow & WILLIAM STROTHER of same Gent. .. for fifty pounds Sterling .. by deeds of lease and release .. sold 200 acres being on Claibournes Run in Parish of Hanover now in possession of said ALICE beginning at land late in possession of THOMAS FITZHUGH Gent. deced the land now in possession of Burwell’s Orphans & land of Majr. WILLIAM THORNTON which he bought of Mr. THOMAS STONE which said 200 acres was bequeathed to said ALICE by Last Will & Testament of EDWARD MADDOX Gent. deced on records of Stafford County Court (Excepting always out of the 200 acres a certain part thereof sold to WILLIAM THORNTON for 35 acres by the said ALICE CALE & CHARLES CALE late Deced her late husband according to bounds mentioned Deeds of sale dated 4th March 1723 now on records of Richmond County Courts) .. Presence Edwd. Barradall, Alice x Cale
John Mercer.  5th December 1729 .. Deeds of Lease & Release together with receipt for consideration money recorded.”

1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp. 249-252.

xii.a. Edward’s 1652 arrival date is based on an unseen record claimed in Ancestry.com, in the book Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s, p. 214.  Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data – Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2010.Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenge

xiii. On 1 March 1668, Edward Maddocks sold a sorrel mare to Mrs. Amey Frankcum according to Proceedings of the County Courts of Charles County 1666-1674, Vol. 60, Pg. 184.

xiv. Maryland Patents Liber WC2, Folio 199, 9 July 1680.

xiv.a. “The Five George Masons: Patriots and Planters of Virginia and Maryland.”  Copeland, Pamela and MacMaster, Richard.  University Press of Virginia: Charlottesville, 1975. P.22.

xv. The 500 acres were broken into three parcels after Dr. Edward Maddox’s death, and willed to three different people.  The parcels are described in three separate documents:

“Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants,” Book No. 3, 1703-1710, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1987, p. 44.

1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp.54- 58.

1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp. 249-252.

xvi. Lyons Hole: Charles County Circuit Court Liber R, Page 144: 31 Dec 1690; Indenture from Daniell Smith of St. Mary’s County, carpenter, to Henry Goodridge; for 6,000# tobacco; a tract called Lyons Hole; bounded by Richard Fowkes’ Vaineall; containing 100 acres; formerly granted to Edward Maddocks by patent; /s/ Daniell Smith (mark); wit. John Wilder, Cleborne Lomax; ack. by Elizabeth Smith, wife of Daniel. [Note: Edward is untitled in this transaction (normally he’s called “apothecary”), and it’s possible that this Edward Maddocks is the younger Edward.]

Doges Neck: Charles County Circuit Court Liber H, Page 132: 5 Sep 1678; Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, to John Reddick; for 30,000# tobacco; a parcel of land called Doges Neck; on the south side of the Piscataway River to the mouth of Chingamuxon Creek; laid out for 200 acres; /s/ Edward Maddock; wit. Rando. Brandt, Geo. Godfrey; acknowledged by Margery wife of Edward Maddock.

Cheshire: Charles County Circuit Court Liber I, Page 125: 5 Jun 1681; Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, and Margery his wife, relict of Matthew Stone, to William Chandler, Gent.; a tract called Cheshires being part of Poynton Manor; inherited by Margery from the will of William Stone; containing 500 acres; for 40,000# of tobacco; /s/ Edward Maddock, Margery Maddock; wit. Tho. Hussy, John Richards.

Greene’s Purchase: Charles County 1671-1674, Vol. 60, Pg. 532-534: “Luke Greene acknowledged the ensueinge Conveyance unto Edward Maddock for two hundred acres of Land called Greenes Purchase in open Court Vizt…”

Stone Hill: Charles County Circuit Court Liber F, Page 22: 29 Oct 1674; Indenture from Henry Aspenall, planter, to Edward Maddocke, apothecary; for 20,000# of tobacco and 300 acres of Stone Hill; a tract called Doegs Neck on the south side of Piscataway River, bound by Chingamuxon Creek; laid out for 450 acres; also a parcel on the east side of the said neck by the sd creek containing 200 acres by patent granted Walter Hall 26 Apr 1658; Isl Henry Aspenall; wit. Richard Edelen, Stephen Murry

Athey’s Hopewell: Charles County Circuit Court Liber F, Page 180: 12 Apr 1676; Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, to Philip Carey; for 3,000# tobacco; a parcel called Athey’s Hopewell; containing 100 acres; /s/ Ed. Maddock; wit. Philip Lines, Luke Greene

Maddock’s Folly: Charles County Circuit Court Liber F, Page 200: 8 Aug 1676; Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, to Philip Lines; for 8,000# tobacco; a parcel called Maddock’s Folly; on the east side of Piscataway River; containing 350 acres; /s/ Edward Maddock; wit. Henry Bonner, Joshua Guibert, John Hamilton

Nanjemoy: Charles Co., MD, Land Record L #1, folio 142: 17 February 1684, Edward Maddock and wife Margery of Stafford Co., VA, conveyed 500 acres called “Nanjemoy” in Charles co. to Gerard Fowke.

Locations of circa-1696 land tracts were estimated for the Broad Creek Historic District Preservation Planning Study. Edward's tracts Lyon's Hole (adjacent to Vainall), Stone Hill and possibly Athey's Hopewell are on the planning study's map. The study places Vainall at 38.756851, -76.985385.

Locations of circa-1696 land tracts were estimated for the Broad Creek Historic District Preservation Planning Study. Edward’s tracts Lyon’s Hole (adjacent to Vainall), Stone Hill and possibly Athey’s Hopewell are on the planning study’s map. The study places Vainall at 38.756851, -76.985385.

xvii. Boogher, William Fletcher. Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760, Old Stafford County. Washington: Saxton Printing Co., 1899, pp. 176-195 – available online at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vastaffo/overwhartonparishregister176.htm.

The acreage that Edward Maddox willed as a parish globe would benefit the Brunswick Parish globe. It was on the south side of what is now called White Oak Road (Rte 218). Source: Land of Hogs and Wildcats: People and Places of Lower Stafford County, Jerrilynn Eby, pp. 532-534.

xvii.a. Edward possibly inherited 600 acres below Potomac Creek when he married the widow Frances Norgrave Mason, according to Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 13 Nov 1690, p. 110: “… John Norgrave did by his last will & testament in writing under his hand and seale dated the 23 of Jan 1669 gave and bequeathed his lands in this county to his loving wife Frances Vizt six hundred acres more or less scituate lying and being on the S. side Potomack Creek where he lived and died for and during her natural life which said Frances afterwards married with Coll. George Mason by which means during her Coverture George Mason and Frances stood seized for the life of Frances of and in the premises until the 10day of Sep 1684 the said George Mason and Frances by their deeds under their hands and seals released the Estate for life and all other their claim or demand in or to the six hundred acres of land and William Norgrave by the deed of release dated as above and acknowledged in Court the 8 Oct 1684 will at large appear by virture of which release William Norgrave as heir to the said Father was seized…”

xviii. Edward’s purchase of plot #15 is recorded in John Mercer’s “Land Book,” which was transcribed in Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, Vol. 35, No. 2, p. 170.  It’s available on ancestry.com.

xviii.a. Land of Herrings and Persimmons: People and Places of Upper Stafford County, Virginia. Jerrilyn Eby, Heritage Books, 2015. p. 192.

xix. For example, Doctor Maddock sued Edmund Lynsy for non-payment of medical bills which he had sent him on August 10 for “divers parcells & quantities of medicines & Visits & Attendance” amounting to 980 pounds of tobacco. Here is the itemized list:

Edmd Lynsy Dr Augt the 10 1668 – 1b
Imprimis for a powder for you Children – 100
A Cordiall for yor sone to take att nights – 050
It: for 2 playsters for yor Children – 100
It: for 15 pills for yor Children – 090
It: for a Cordiall Julep for yor Children – 100
It: for a Lotion for yor Daughters mouth – 030
It: a purging apozem for yor Wife – 100
It: a Cordiall for yor Children – 060
It: a Cordiall Electuary for yor Wife – 100
It: to five Visits to yor Daughter & son – 250 980

Edmond Lynsy was ordered to pay his bill plus 60 pounds for attorney fees and 120 pounds for four days attendance in court. (Source: Proceedings of the County Courts of Charles County 1666-1674, Vol. 60, pg. 246-247)

Another example from Charles County Court Proceedings, 1668—1670, Liber D, p. 116: “Edwd Maddock Chirurgion p order of Court hath undertaken to Cure Lucy Good of a Lame Legg for whose Care till May next is to be allowed out of the County Levy eight hundred pounds of Ton: & if he Cure the sd Lucy of her Lameness is also allowed one years
service from the sd Lucy.”

xx. Charles Co., Md. Circuit Court, Liber K, p. 335.

xxi. Colonial Survey Report #3964, p. 16, in the Virginia State Archives.

xxi.a. Stafford County, Virginia, Record Book, p. 54 [requires specific source reference].

xxii. Litigation lasted almost a year:

Oct. 28, 1684-Nov. 11, 1684 – Cornelius Maddocke vs. Edward Maddocke for 1000 lbs. tobacco. Edward Maddocke appears by his attorney Edmund Dennis. (Charles Co., Md. Circuit Court, Liber L, p. 15.)

Nov. 12, 1684-Jan. 13, 1684/5 – Cornelius Maddocke vs. Edward Maddocke for 1000 lbs. of tobacco. The said action is continued. (Charles Co., Md. Circuit Court, Liber L, p. 69.)

Mar. 11, 1684/5 – Cornelius Maddock, merchant vs. Edward Maddock, surgeon. Suit on Edward’s note to Cornelius of Sep. 17, 1684 for 1070 lbs. of tobacco. Edward admits that he owes Cornelius 1000 lbs. of tobacco. Judgment for Cornelius for 1000 lbs. of tobacco. (Charles Co., Md. Circuit Court, Liber L, pp. 106-7.)

xxiii. The following records demonstrate Edward’s marriage to Margery Stone from 1678 to 1684:

Charles County Circuit Court Liber H, Page 132
5 Sep 1678; Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, to John Reddick; for 30,000# tobacco; a parcel of land called Doges Neck; on the south side of the Piscataway River to the mouth of Chingamuxon Creek; laid out for 200 acres; /s/ Edward Maddock; wit. Rando. Brandt, Geo. Godfrey; acknowledged by Margery wife of Edward Maddock

Charles County Circuit Court Liber I, Page 125
5 Jun 1681; Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, and Margery his wife, relict of Matthew Stone, to William Chandler, Gent.; a tract called Cheshires being part of Poynton Manor; inherited by Margery from the will of William Stone; containing 500 acres; for 40,000# of tobacco; /s/ Edward Maddock, Margery Maddock; wit. Tho. Hussy, John Richards

Mathew Stone 7C.250 A CH #41835 #66628 Jul 26 1682
Payments to: Mr. Robert Doyne for Col. William Calvert, Esq., Col. Benjamin Rozer, Mr. John Clarke, Mr. Robert Doyne, Philip Lynes, Bennett Marchegay, Mr. John Fanning, Mr. John Saunders, William Wells, Robert Thompson, Sr, Thomas Helgar, John Hanson, Richard Beck, Mr. William Barrett, Mr, Joseph Manning who married Mary (relict and executrix of John Blackfan), Mr. John Hamilton attorney for William Gough, Mr. John Hamilton attorney for Robert Potts,, Mr. John Hamilton attorney for Mr. Robert Carvile (executor of Elisabeth Moye (executrix of Richard Moye)), Philip Lynes per order of Mr. John Stone on account of Mr. Thomas Clipsham, Richard Edelen on account of James Nuttwell, Mr, Garrett Vansweringhen, Mr, Robert Doyne on account of Mr. Thomas Clipsham & account of Mr. William Barrett.
Executrix: Marjery Maddock (relict), wife of Edward Maddock.

17 February 1684, Edward Maddock and wife Margery of Stafford Co., VA, conveyed 500 acres called “Nanjemoy” in Charles co. to Gerard Fowke. [Source: Charles Co., MD, Land Record L #1, folio 142]

Charles County Circuit Court Liber L, Page 140
19 Feb 1684; Indenture from Edward Maddock of Stafford County, Virginia, surgeon, and Margery Maddock his wife, to Gerard Fowke, Gent.; for 440 acres of land in Stafford County, a tract in Avon/Nangemy of 500 acres where Edward and Margery Maddock lately dwelled; willed by Capt. Wm. Stone to Mathew Stone; from Mathew to Margery [his wife); /s/ Edw. Maddock, Margery Maddock; wit. Ralph Elkins, Wm. Dent

Feb. 19, 1684. Edward Maddock (surgeon) of Stafford Co., VA, and Margery his wife conveyed 440 acres in Stafford Co., VA. He also sold a tract in Nanjemoy Parish, Charles Co., MD, of 500 acres land that was willed by Capt. William Stone to his son Matthew Stone, and from Matthew Stone to his wife Margery. [Charles Co., MD Court and Land Records. Date below in 1694.]

xxiii.a. Evidence that Edward took possession of property from his wife Margery Stone:

Charles County Circuit Court Liber I, Page 125, 5 Jun 1681: “Indenture from Edward Maddock, apothecary, and Margery his wife, relict of Matthew Stone, to William Chandler, Gent.; a tract called Cheshires being part of Poynton Manor; inherited by Margery from the will of William Stone; containing 500 acres; for 40,000# of tobacco; /s/ Edward Maddock, Margery Maddock; wit. Tho. Hussy, John Richards”

Charles Co., MD Court and Land Records, Feb. 19, 1684: “Edward Maddock (surgeon) of Stafford Co., VA, and Margery his wife conveyed 440 acres in Stafford Co., VA. He also sold a tract in Nanjemoy Parish, Charles Co., MD, of 500 acres land that was willed by Capt. William Stone to his son Matthew Stone, and from Matthew Stone to his wife Margery.”

xxiv. From STAFFORD COUNTY VA DEED & WILL BOOK 1689 – 1693; THE ANTIENT PRESS, p. 208: “19 Jun 1691: TO ALL XPIAN PEOPLE to whom these presents shall come I EDWARD MADDOCKSof Stafford County this 19th day of June 1691 and in ye Third yeare of ye Reigne of or Sovereigne Lord & Lady KINGE WILLIAM & QUEEN MARY of Englande haveinge lately intermarried with FRANCES ye late Widdow & Relick of Colo. GEORGE MASON late of this County deced and haveinge by vertue of ye said Intermarriage wth ye said FRANCES a full & absolute right to all & full ye just thirds of ye said Colo. GEORGE MASON psonall Estate for ever wth a full right to ye Thirds of all ye real! Estate of Colo. GEORGE MASON deced accordinge to ye Lawes & Customes of England and ye Lawes of this our Dominion of Virginia in consideracon of a Mulatto Wench called Primo of about ye age of Twenty three yeares & her child allready in hande delivered into my possession and for & in consideracon of ye sume of Forty pounds lawful! English money to me secured to bee paid, and for ye Naturall love and true affecon that I bear unto ye said GEORGE MASON of ye aforesaid County of Stafford Gent!. ye onley Sonne & Heir of ye aforesaid Colo. GEORGE MASON deced receipt of wch doe acknowledge have by vertue of these presents sell from mee my heires all and singular my right and proprietorship that I have in & to full and Third parte of ye said Coll. GEO: MASON deced personall Estate for ever and to ye third pte of ye Reall Estate of ye said Coll. GEORGE MASON wch right I have by vertue of my Intermarriage with ye said FRANCES ye Widdow & relict of ye said Coll. GEORGE MASON aforesaid & dureinge her naturall life doe for ever make over & convey unto him ye said GEORGE MASON all & singular ye above men-coned premises to him his Heires for ever, and doe further oblidge me my self my heires to warrant and Indeminfie him ye said GEORGE MASON from all claims of any manner of pson from any damadge that may accrue or happen to him ye said GEORGE MASON his heires or assignes and Lastley I the said EDWARD MADDOCKS doe oblidge my selfe my heires to acknowledge this full & generall release and dischardge of all ye abovesaid premises to him ye said GEORGE MASON to bee held for ye County of Stafford and to give him such further and generall dischardge as bee shall require as bee or they shall require as his or their Councell Learned in ye Law shall advise or direct unto him or them att any time wthin seven yeares if lawfully required. In Wittness of ye Truth and for ye confirmacon I have sett my hande and affixed my Seale. n presence of us JAMES REED, ED: MADDOCKS, JAMES HEARSE. This before menconed Deed of Gift was acknowledged by EDWARD MADDOCKE to GEORGE MASON in ye County Court of Stafford on the 12th day of August 1691 & was then recorded.”

Edward’s inheritance from Frances (Norgrave) Mason also was litigated in a long series of court documents in which Norgrave heirs were seeking inheritances:

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, Page 74 (contd) Orphans Court held 9th July 1690.785. Whereas Docter EDWARD MADDOCKE by the sheriff summoned unto this Court to bring security and give bond concerning the Estate of Capt. JOHN NORGRAVE deced but forasmuch as Docter Edward Maddocke was not proved with the same Therefore tis ordered that he shall be summoned to next Court to bring security to perform the will of Capt. John Norgrave deced according to Law which has since been done as the Law directs.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, Page 74 (contd) Orphans Court held 9th July 1690
793. Mr. GERRARD LOWTHER did appear in this Court the attorney of Doctor EDWARD MADDOCKE concerning the Estate of Capt. JOHN NORGRAVE deceased. 4) Orphans Court 9 Jul 1690 p76_ Mr. Gerrard Lowther, Atty. for Dr. Edward Maddocke appeared in court concerning the estate of Capt. John Norgrave dec’d

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 9 Jul 1690 p75- Dr. Edward Maddocke summoned into court to bring security and give bond concerning the estate of Capt. John Norgrave.
Stafford County, Virginia Order Book Page 87 Court held 9th September 1690
821.. SAMPSON DARRELL who married the sole Daughter now living of Captain JOHN NORGRAVE petitioned this Court for a cow and Signet of Armes which was left by the will of Capt. John Norgrave to one or either of his children according as his Execrs appointed in his will should see fit to bestow as appears more fully by the Will here in Court produced and forasmuch as Sampson Darrell complains that FRANCES the Widow and Executrix appointed in Capt. John Norgraves will doth as yet unjustly keep and detain from him one cow and Signet of Armes in right of MARGARET his wife Therefore humbly prays that Dr. EDWARD MADDOCKS who intermarried with Frances the Executrix of Capt. John Norgrave may be ofdered by this Court to deliver the cow and Signet of Armes And Dr. Edward Maddocks comes into Court and proves that the Signet of Armes was disposed on by Frances his wife according to the Tenor of the Will .. and forasmuch as it doth plainly appear to this Court that there is yet one cow due Sampson Darrell in right of his wife Therefore tis ordered that Dr. Edward Maddocks who intermarried with Frances the widow and relict of Capt. John Norgrave deced shall Immediately deliver to the afsd Sampson Darrell one good able cow in his right to the aforesaid according to the full True intent and meaning of the Last will and Testament of the said Capt. John Norgrave.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book Page 87 Court held 9th September 1690
822. SAMSON DARRELL who married the sole daughter now Living of Capt. JOHN NORGRAVE Petitioned this Court that Docter EDWARD MADDOCKS who married the relict and Exectx of the said John Norgrave deced might give security for the performance of the said Will according to the Tenor thereof and further alledged that Coll. Mason in his lifetime and all the time of his life gave Security and that Since his decease one of his Securitys are dead alsoe Therefore he prays the said Coll. Mason being dead as afsd and his Security dead Likewise that the said Docter Maddocks who Since intermarried as afsd and hath by the said Intermarriage the possession and Enjoyment of the said Norgraves Estate may be compelled to Enter into bond with good and Sufficient Securitys to be accountable for the same according to the request of the deced and as the Law enjoynes which said motion of Darrells is approved of by this Court and doe accordingly order that the said Doct Edward Maddocks doe immediately give good Security and Enter into bond for the same as the Law directs And he comes by GERRARD LOWTHER his Attorney and put in these reasons And Gerrard Lowther the attorney of Doct Edward Maddocks comes and puts in his plea in writing against Sampson Darrell and gives these reasons whereby he humbly presumes that he ought not nor is Liable to give Security Vizt. as to the Cattle they are paid Secondly the Ring is given to the Legatees according to, as to the negroes they are a personal Chattle and a remainder Limitted in the will of a Chatle personal is void because if given for an hour they are given forever but they are given to Mrs. Maddock for her life so that the remainder after her decease is void Therefore for them no Security ought to be given 4thly no Execr named by the Testator in his will are by Law compellable to find Security for the performance of the Testators will but we are Execrs therefore unless the Law will dispose and Intrust his Estate of the Testator otherwise than he designed we are not obliged to find Security for performance of the Testators will and this appears by the provision made by the Laws of this Country that admrs shall finde Security but no Law doth oblige Execrs 65 Act of assembly 21 Hen 8:15 Vide Title probate of Testaments in Wingates abridgment Lastly there has been Security already found in this matter and if the Court have discharged them without others we are not daily bound to finde new Securitys. With which Judgment of the Court as afsd he the said Edward Maddocks the deft not being content doth appeale to the Sixth day of the next General Court there to be heard before the honourable the Governour and Councel of State at James City. SAMUEL HAYWARD became Security with the said Edward Maddocks to present his appeale And ROBERT BRENT with Sampson Darrell to answer.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 10 Sep 1690 p101-Samson Darrell asks court to compell Edward Maddocks to enter bond for Norgraves Estate.
Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, Page 101 Court held 10th September 1690
868. SAMSON DARRELL who married the Sole daughter now living of Capt. JOHN NORGRAVE petitions this Court that EDWARD MADDOCK who married the Relict and Executrix of the said Norgrave deced might give security for the performance of the said Will according to the Tenor thereof and farther alledged that Coll. Mason in his lifetime and all the time of his life gave security and that since his decease one of his Sectys is dead also Therefore prays the said Coll. Mason being dead and his Security dead likewise that Doctor Maddocks who is since Intermarried and hath by the Intermarriage the possession and Enjoyment of the said Norgraves Estate may be compelled to enter Bond with good and sufficient security to be accountable for the same according to the bequest of the deced & as the Law Injoynes And Doctor Edward Maddock comes into Court by GERRARD LOWTHER his attorney and refuses to put in Security for these reasons following Vizt. 1. As to the cattle they are paid 2d the Ring is given the Legatee according to the Will 3. As to the negroes they are a personal chattel and a remainder Limited in the Will a Chattel personal is void because if given for one hour they are given forever they are given to Maddock for her life so that the remainder after her decease is void therefore from them no security ought to be given 4. noe Exectr named by the Testator in his will are by Law compelled to find Security for the performance of the Testators Will but we are Exectrs Therefore unless the Law will dispose and Intrust his Estate of the Testator otherwise then he designed we are not obliged to find security for performance of the Testators will and this appears by the provision made by the Laws of this Countrey that admrs shall find Security but no Law does oblige Exectrs 65 act of assembly 21 Henry 8. 15 Vid Title Probates of Testaments in Wingates abrigmt. Lastly there has been Security already found in this matter and if the Court have discharged them without other we are not every day bound to find new security.
And the Court having fully and maturelay considered the matter doe unanimously concurr with and approve of Darrells motion and they do accordingly order and Therefore tis ordered that Doctor Edward Maddock shall give good security and enter into bond accordingly for the same as the Law doth Enjoyn and direct with which Judgment of the Court Edward Maddock not being there-with content doth appeale to the Sixth day of the next General Court to be held at James City. Mr. SAMUEL HAYWARD became security with Doctor Edward Maddocks to prosecute his appeale and ROBERT BRENT with Sampson Darrell to answer his appeale.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 9 Nov 1690 p8687 -Sampson Darrell who md. the sole daughter now living of Capt. John Norgrave petitioned the court for a cow and Signet of Armes which was left by the will of Capt. John Norgrave to one or either of his children ….he says Frances does unjustly keep cow and Signet of Armes.. prays the Dr. Edward Maddocks who intermarried with Frances the Executrix of Capt. John Norgrave be ordered to deliver the same. Dr. Edward Maddocks comes into court and proves that the said Signet of Armes was disposed on by Frances according to the Tenor of the Will …Court orders Dr. Edward Maddocks to produce one cow due Sampson Darrell.
Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, Page 105, Court held 12th November 1690
889. Ordered that Doctor EDWARD MADDOCKS who intermarried with FRANCES the widow and relict of Coll. GEORGE MASON late of this County deced who was formerly the widow and Executrix of Capt. JOHN NORGRAVE late of this County also deced shall be by the sherif summoned to next Court to give security Touching the Estate of Capt. John Norgrave deced pursuant to an order of the last General Court and that he bring good security with him to Enter into Bond for the true and faithful performance of the said Will of Capt. John Norgrave.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 12 Nov 1690 p105-Dr. Edward Maddocks who intermarried with Frances the widow of Coll. George Mason and formerly the widow of Capt. John Norgrave to bring security with him to enter into bond for the true and faith ful performance of the sia will of Capt. John Norgrave.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 13 Nov 1690 p110- Samson Darrell who md. the daughter of Capt. John Norgrave deced and is the only sister living of Wm. Norgrave son and heire of John Norgrave complaining sheweth that John Norgrave did by his last will & testament in writing under his hand and seale dated the 23 of Jan 1669 gave and bequeathed his lands in this county to his loving wife Frances Vizt six hundred acres more or less scituate lying and being on the S. side Potomack Creek where he lived and died for and during her natural life which said Frances afterwards married with Coll. George Mason by which means during her Coverture George Mason and Frances stood seized for the life of Frances of and in the premises until the 10day of Sep 1684 the said George Mason and Frances by their deeds under their hands and seals released the Estate for life and all other their claim or demand in or to the six hundred acres of land and William Norgrave by the deed of release dated as above and acknowledged in Court the 8 Oct 1684 will at large appear by virture of which release William Norgrave as heir to the said Father was seized…

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 10 Jun 1691 p149- Court orders Dr. Edward Maddocks or Capt. George Mason both or either of them to bring in an inventory accompts orders papers and all other matters and things relating to the Estate of Capt John Norgrave.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 10 Jun 1691 -p148- Edward Maddocks humbly sheweth that your Petr having intermarried with Frances the widow and relict of Coll. George Mason deced who formerly was the widow and sole executrix of Capt. John Norgrave and forasmuch as the estate of Capt. John Norgrave was never separated nor divided from the estate of Coll. George Mason deced so that your petr is not sensible of what he stands charged with to this court by bond and security where upon he humbly prays your Worships to order Capt. George Mason the son and sole Executor of Coll. George Mason to give in a true and perfect account of The estate of Capt. John Norgrave to deliver the same to your petitioner to the intent that your petitioner may performe truely and faithfully what the law requires of him touching the said estate and the court having maturely and deliberately considered of the premises doe accordingly order that Doctr. Edward Maddocks or Capt. George Mason both or either of them shall bring in the Inventory accomts orders papers and all other matters and things relating to the Estate of Capt. John Norgrave deced to the next court to the intent that the whole estate may be delivered in the Custody and safe possession of Edward Maddocks that he may faithfully performe what the Law directs touching the said Estate. .

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 15 Sep 1692 p303- Edward Maddocks humbly complaining sheweth that upon your Petrs humble Petition to your worships your worships were pleased to order that Capt. George Mason should render an account in Court of the Estate of Capt. John Norgrave deced as by the said order dated the 11 Jun 1691 will appear together with the reasons of granting the said order which as yet having not been performed your petitioner humbly prays your worships to reinforce your said order and to cause Capt. George Mason to perform on his part what is by worships formerly ordered. And the court having throughly and maturely considerd the premises and the Equitablenesse thereof doe accordingly order that Capt. George Mason shall bring a True and Just account of Norgraves Estate with all papers and accounts relating thereto to the next Court according to the aforementioned order. Sampson Darell came into Court in Propria Persona and desired his exceptions might be entered in the records of the County that he makes a full Exception on his owne and the orphans of Norgrave deced behald- for the ale and alienationof the said Capt. John Norgraves Estate etx Edward Maddocks who intermarried with Frances the widow and Executrix of the said Capt. John Norgrave deced to Mr. William Buckner of this county. Then follows a summary of lawyers and clients.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 7 Mar 1692/3 p328-Complaint fo Sampson Darrell for and concerning the orphans of Capt. John Norgrave deced be referred to the next court.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 6 Apr 1693 p339-Dr. Edward Maddocks who md. the widow of Coll George Mason deced who was the widow and executrix of Capt. John Norgrave did exhibit a petition to this court etc…the whole ordered to the said Dr. Edward Maddocks against the said George Mason is the sum of nine thousand seven hundred fifty and six pounds of tobacco as the whole ballance of the estate of the said Norgrave which the said George Mason is ordered to make present payment of the same.

Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 13 Sep 1693 p376- Edward Maddocks in answer to Sampson Darrell -produces will of John Norgrave:
WILL OF JOHN NORGRAVE 28 Oct 1664 I give and bequeath unto my well beloved wife Frances all my real and peresonal estate whatsoever at present in my possession in the county afsd for and during her said life and if it should please God that either my said wife or either of my children, William Norgrave, Mary or Margaret should die each before the other my said Estate Equally to be divided to the survivors of my said children and made his said wife his whole and sole Executrix and died. Since whose death dyed the said William his son and since his death died also the said Mary his daughter after whose respective deaths the sole property in exppentancy of all and singular the goods and chattels of the said John Norgrave Sr. so devised to the said Frances his wife as afsd did by Vertue of the said will and Testament of the said John Vest in the said Margaret as surviving child of the said John as afsd and to be possessed immediately after the death of the said Frances and the said Sampson th Plt. marrying the said Margaret the susrviving child to the said John as afsd had by her issue the afsd Sampson Jr., William & Benoni Since which the said Margaret is also dead after whose death the Right and Property in Expentancy as afsd of all and singular the said goods and chattels Vested in the said Sampson Junr. William and Benoni as representing the said Margaret their deced mother and to be possessed immediately from and after the said Frances as afsd. Since which the said Frances is also dead. Immediately after whose death the right title and Possession & property of all and singular the goods and chattles of the said John Norgrave soe deced and so devised as aforesd of right belongs and appetains unto the afsd Sampson Junr.

xxiv.a. Frances Norgrave Mason received land from her first husband John Norgrave, according to Stafford County, Virginia Order Book, 13 Nov 1690, p. 110: “Samson Darrell who md. the daughter of Capt. John Norgrave deced and is the only sister living of Wm. Norgrave son and heire of John Norgrave complaining sheweth that John Norgrave did by his last will & testament in writing under his hand and seale dated the 23 of Jan 1669 gave and bequeathed his lands in this county to his loving wife Frances Vizt six hundred acres more or less scituate lying and being on the S. side Potomack Creek where he lived and died for and during her natural life which said Frances afterwards married with Coll. George Mason by which means during her Coverture George Mason and Frances stood seized for the life of Frances of and in the premises until the 10day of Sep 1684 the said George Mason and Frances by their deeds under their hands and seals released the Estate for life and all other their claim or demand in or to the six hundred acres of land and William Norgrave by the deed of release dated as above and acknowledged in Court the 8 Oct 1684 will at large appear by virture of which release William Norgrave as heir to the said Father was seized…”

xxv. “Notes from the Records of Stafford County, Virginia, Order Books (Continued),” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 45, No. 3 (Jul., 1937), pp. 243-259.  Available online at http://www.jstor.org/stable/4244801?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents.

xxv.a. “They Called Stafford Home”, Jerrilynn Eby, 1997, p. 199.

xxvi. An account of Dr. Edward Maddox’s will is recorded in a circa-1899 history of Stafford County’s Overwharton Parish, in which the author claims Dr. Maddox willed the entirety of his estate – 450-500 acres with a home along the Passapantanzy Creek in Stafford County – to the John Waugh’s parish in 1694. Importantly, in this account Dr. Edward Maddox was apparently punishing his heir, Amey Maddox (probably a misspelling of Anne Maddox), by not willing anything to her. Here’s an account of the Parish register by circa 1899 researcher William Boogher:

“The largest legacy that Overwharton Parish received during the Seventeenth Century was from Doctor Edward Maddox. The last will and Testament of Doctor Edward Maddox ‘of Stafford Parish, Stafford, in the Colony of Virginia’ was dated June 23, 1694; it was admitted to probate on December 11, 1694. His only child, Amy Maddox, married without his approbation, Thomas Derrick and for this reason Doctor Maddox mad the following bequest:

‘I first give and bequeath this plantation whereupon I now live and all the lands thereto appertaining and to me belonging to be and forever after to continue as a glebe and manse for the reception and encouragement of a pious and able minister in that parish wherein I now live being commonly known and called by the name of Stafford, or the upper parish of Stafford County; and that after my decease it be well and truly improved and managed at all times for the intent above said excepting that while there is no minister to serve ye cure in the said parish then I will and desire that the said plantation and land together with all its profits and advantages (before the time of vacancy above said) fully improved and laid out for the relief and support of such poor and indigent as in the said parish shall seem most in want at the discretion of the church wardens and vestry of the above said parish for the time being.’

“Doctor Maddox’s plantation consisted of between 450 and 500 acres on Passapantanzy Creek not far from the plantation of the Reverend Mr. John Waugh. It was enjoyed as a glebe by the curate of Stafford [later Overwharton] Parish until after the death of the Reverend Mr. Robert Buchan in 1804 when Doctor Maddox’s descendants instigated suit claiming it was no longer being used as stipulated in his last will and Testament and recovered it.” – From Boogher, William Fletcher. Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760, old Stafford County. Washington: Saxton Printing Co., 1899, pp. 176-195, online at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vastaffo/overwhartonparishregister176.htm.

xxvii. The date of Edward’s original will is recorded as 23 June 1694 will and his probate date is recorded as 11 December 1694, in the following records:

“Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants,” Book No. 3, 1703-1710, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1987, p. 44.

1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp.54- 58.

1721-1735 King George County Deed Book 1, Part 1, (Antient Press); pp. 249-252.

Boogher, William Fletcher. Virginia, Overwharton Parish Register, 1720 to 1760, Old Stafford County. Washington: Saxton Printing Co., 1899, pp. 176-195.

xxviii. Parson John Waugh and Thomas Elsey were appointed to administer Edward Maddox’s estate according to Westmoreland County Order Book 1690-1698, Part Three (1694-1698), p. 178-179